1.   Introduction

Bath and North East Somerset Council has a statutory power to ensure that all streets and properties are correctly named and numbered within the District. The formal principles for this are set out in our Street Naming and Numbering Policy along with the legal basis of the policy.

These guidelines provide more detail on how streets names and numbers are allocated.

2.   Street Naming and Numbering Guidelines

(a)  Naming and numbering of New Streets

As far as possible, proposed names for new streets should reflect the history or geography of the site or the surrounding area

A new street will normally be numbered with odd numbers on the left and even numbers on the right from the entrance of the street. In the case of a cul-de-sac, consecutive numbering in a clockwise direction is carried out. All numbers will be sequential although number 13 is usually omitted. Where an existing street is to be extended, the same street name would be used together with a continuation of street numbers. 

(b) Renaming an existing street

On rare occasions, it may be necessary to rename a street. Like new streets, proposed new names for existing streets should reflect the history or geography of the site or the surrounding area

(c)  Renumbering properties within a street

On rare occasions, it may be necessary to renumber a street or part of a street. This will be done to produce a logical sequence of numbers

(d) Numbering and/or naming properties within an existing street

Requests for naming and/or numbering of properties are received in writing by developers or property owners. A check is carried out on the Land and Property Gazetteer database to ensure non-duplication of names and numbers. If a duplication of a name occurs or there are similarly named properties within the vicinity then the developer or owners are informed and an alternative name is submitted.

New properties in streets where the existing properties are numbered will be allocated a new number. Individual properties built on infill land e.g. large gardens, or on a site of previously demolished properties, will be numbered within the existing sequence if possible. A number with a letter suffix e.g.16A, 16B, 16C, will be used if necessary. Where a single building is erected on the site of a demolished property, the new building will normally inherit the existing number.

Where two or more properties on a numbered street are merged the numbers of the original properties are normally retained. For example 2 and 4 High Street being combined would become 2-4, High Street. There are, however, instances where it may be considered appropriate to use a single number. Each case will be considered on its merits. Surplus numbers will be retained for re-use should the property be split again in the future.

If a building has entrances onto more than one street, is a multi-occupied building and each entrance leads to a separate occupier, then each entrance will normally be numbered onto the street it is accessed. Exceptions to this may be necessary in some instances.

Where a property is sub-divided, as in the case of flats and apartments, individual properties should always be numbered rather than described or lettered (i.e. Flat 1 rather than First Floor Flat or Flat A). Where numbered properties are sub-divided, individual units will either be addressed by reference to the main property (e.g. Flat 1, 24, High Street) or they may be given a separate suffix (e.g. 24A, 24B). Although the floor level does not form part of the official address, it may be included as an alternative address in the LLPG for the benefit of the emergency services. In a terrace, a mixture of residential and commercial properties may be allocated the same number, even when they have separate entrances.

(e) Change of House Names or Flat Numbers

Requests for renaming or renumbering a property must be received in writing by the owners of the property only. Tenants should make an application though their landlord. We cannot formally change a property name where the property is in the process of being purchased until exchange of contracts. A check is carried out on the Land and Property Gazetteer database to ensure non-duplication of names and numbers. If there is a possibility of duplication then the owners are informed and an alternative name or number is proposed. If an owner wishes to rename a building that is divided into flats or maisonettes, then evidence that they have notified all occupiers of that building of the proposed change should be supplied before renaming is carried out.

(f) Demolitions

Where a building is demolished then the existing numbering sequence is retained and reused as far as possible in any new development.

3. Entry into Local Land and Property Gazetteer and Local Street Gazetteer

Addresses are entered in the LLPG in accordance with BS7666, the current data entry conventions and data transfer format published by the Local Government Information House. Changes are normally submitted to the national hub daily.

Streets are entered into the Local Street Gazetteer in accordance with BS7666, legislation from Department of Transport and the data entry conventions and data transfer format published by the Local Government Information House. Changes are submitted to the national hub monthly, which is the frequency prescribed by legislation.

February 2011

Download these Street Naming and Numbering Guidelines in PDF format 35kb

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